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English Lesson Plan

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English Lesson Plan

Analyzing a Hawaiian Myth and Creating a Hawaiian Poem

Grade Level: 5-12

Class: English

Classes Intergraded: Music (using poem in hula music)

Gym (using poem to create hula dance)

Art (create symbols based on poem to be worn when dancing the hula dance in gym class)

History/Geography (using Hawaiian culture and myths to help create the hula poem)

Objective: By reading and translating words to the story Naughty Elepaio, students will

have a greater knowledge of Hawaiian text which they can use to create a poem for the hula.

State Standards:

Standard 14: Poetry

Students will identify, analyze, and apply knowledge of the themes, structure, and elements of poetry and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.
• Identify and respond to the effects of form, sound, figurative language, and graphics in order to uncover meaning in poetry.
• Sound (alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme schemes)
• Figurative language (personification, metaphor, simile, hyperbole)
• Graphics (capital letters, line length, word position)

Standard 15: Style and Language

Students will identify and analyze how an author’s words appeal to the senses, create imagery, suggest mood, and set tone, and will provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.

• Identify sensory details, figurative language, and rhythm or flow when responding to literature.

Standard 11: Theme

Students will identify, analyze, and apply knowledge of theme in a literary work and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.


Equipment:
Each student will need to have one copy of the Naughty Elepaio and another copy of the Naughty Elepaio with the bold words whited out. Students will also need pencils and paper.

Procedure:
1. Pass our the Naughty Elepaio story and word guide to each student.

2. Have the class take turns reading the story aloud in front of the class.

3. Pass out another copy of the story with the bold text whited out.

4. Ask the students to place the correct Hawaiian translation of words in each whited out spot, based on the copy of the story with the bold English text.

5. Break the students into groups of four.

6. Ask the students to read the story to eachother in their groups using the translated Hawaiian text.

7. In the groups formed, ask students to create a poem about the Hawaiian love for nature, people, history of family, or honored god or goddess (may have been utilized in the history/geography class).

Poem Guidelines:

A. Must be at least three stanzas

B. Must include at least five Hawaiian words.

Homework: Students must type their poems and bring them to art class for symbol construction and to music class to create hula music to.

Closing: Thank you class for being so constructive today. After you type and print your poems, you can bring them to your art class to create symbols and music to create hula music to.

Grading: Students completed the translation portion of the assignment. After which, worked as a group to create a poem using poem guidelines A and B listed on procedure number 7.  Use the grading ruberic given and consider procedure number seven as one of the guidelines for the student to execute.
 
Potential Problems and Outcome:
Most student may have a hard time pronouncing the Hawaiian vocabulary.  If this persists, the teacher should do a vocal lesson by having the students look as Hawaiian words while the teachers says them aloud and has the class speak them back. 
Some students will need guidance with the creativity needed to construct a poem.  If this happens, ask the students what is important to Hawaiians (culture, nature, community) and have them apply such concepts to thier poems. 
The goal of the project is to have each person as a result of analysis of a Hawaiian myth, be able to create a poem which can then be brought to the music classroom and used as words for a hula song.

Grading Ruberic Subject:
High Achievement
Good Achievement
Poor Achievement
Attention
The student displayed close attention to classroom instructions and was able to execute the task at hand.
The student displayed close attention to classroom instructions but took time to execute the task at hand.
The student displayed little or no attention to classroom instructions and had trouble executing the task at hand.
Class Particpation
The student portrayed excellent class particpation by asking and answering questions.
The student portrayed good class particpation by asking and answering a minimal amount of questions.
The student portrayed little or no particpation in asking and answering questions.
Cultural Understanding
The student displayed an affection for learning and understanding the aspects of the culture of Hawaii.
The student displayed semi-affection for learning and understanding the aspects of the culture of Hawaii.
The student displayed no affection for learning and understanding the aspects of the culture of Hawaii.